PICTURED: Three heroic American firefighters who died fighting fires


The three American firefighters who died when their water-bombing plane crashed while trying to fight Australia’s catastrophic bushfires have been identified.  

Captain Ian McBeth, from Montana, First Officer Paul Hudson, from Arizona, and Flight Engineer Rick DeMorgan Jr, from Florida, were all on board the C-130 Hercules, Zeus when they lost control.

The jet exploded into a fireball on impact near Peak View in the state of New South Wales after losing contact with the ground at about 1.45pm on Thursday local time.

Fire chiefs hailed the men as ‘remarkable’, well-respected professionals with decades of experience on both sides of the Pacific.

Pictured: Captain Ian McBeth, from Great Falls, Montana, was an experienced pilot who had dedicated years of his life to fighting fires in the military and with Coulson Aviation

Pictured: First Officer Paul Hudson served in the United States Marine Corp for 20 years

Pictured: Captain Ian McBeth, from Great Falls, Montana, was an experienced pilot who had dedicated years of his life to fighting fires in the military and with Coulson Aviation

Pictured: Flight engineer Rick DeMorgan is survived by his wife and two children. He had more than 4,000 hours experience

Pictured: Flight engineer Rick DeMorgan is survived by his wife and two children. He had more than 4,000 hours experience

McBeth, a 44-year-old father-of-three from Great Falls, Montana, was an experienced pilot who had dedicated years of his life to fighting fires in the military and with Coulson Aviation.

He is survived by his beloved wife, Bowdie, and three children, Abigail, Calvin and Ella. 

According to a press release from Coulson Aviation, McBeth was a highly qualified and respected pilot who spent his entire career flying C-130 planes. He previously served with the Wyoming Air National Guard and was still a member of the Montana Air National Guard 120th Airlift Wing at the time of his death.

‘It is with a heavy heart that I inform you we lost a valued Airmen and friend last night,’ Col. Buel Dickson, commander of Montana Air National Guard 120th Airlift Wing, wrote in a Facebook post. ‘Ian was instrumental in the flying success of the 120th Airlift Wing and will be dearly missed. 

‘Our thoughts and prayers go out to his family as they navigate this painful and tragic situation. It is never an easy thing to manage, the loss of a brother in arms affects us all. Please know through difficult times such as these you are never alone.’  

McBeth is survived by his wife, Bowdie

Ian and Bowdie are pictured with their children, Abigail, Calvin and Ella

McBeth is survived by his wife, Bowdie, and their three children, Abigail, Calvin and Ella. The family live in Great Falls, Montana 

First Officer Paul Hudson, 42, from Buckeye, Arizona, served in the United States Marine Corp for 20 years. 

He held numerous positions throughout his tenure, including as a C-130 pilot, with the call sign ‘Fluffer.’ 

Hudson retired from the US Marine Corps as a decorated lieutenant colonel. He then went on to earn duel Master’s degrees in business administration and IT management from the Naval Postgraduate School.

He is survived by his wife, Noreen, with whom he had just finished building a new house in Buckeye, Arizona.

Hudson’s father-in-law told 12 News that the pilot had been in Australia since November 2019 and was scheduled to return home this week, but he agreed to stay on to help with the firefighting efforts.

A former comrade shared this throwback photo of First Officer Paul Hudson (right) as a young US Marine

A former comrade shared this throwback photo of First Officer Paul Hudson (right) as a young US Marine 

Hudson had just built a new home in Buckeye with his wife, Noreen. His father-in-law said Noreen is on her way to Australia to bring her husband back home.

Arizona Governor Doug Ducey tweeted his condolences after learning of Hudson’s death.

‘Arizona is heartbroken by this news,’ the statement read. ‘First Officer Paul Hudson was a hero who dedicated his life to service, first as a Marine, then as a firefighter. And when help was needed to fight wildfires in Australia, he didn’t hesitate. Arizona’s prayers go out to him & his family.

‘In honor of First Officer Hudson’s life and service, I’m ordering flags across the state be lowered to half-staff.’

Former comrades and friends took to social media to pay their respects to the fallen hero.

‘I was honored to serve and deploy with you, sir,’ wrote retired serviceman Chris Wood. ‘Two Afghanistan deployments flying with you, very sad to hear of your passing.. But, proud to see that you were still serving others as a firefighter pilot in Australia. Rest easy, and Semper Fidelis.’ 

DeMorgan, 43, from Navarre, Florida, is survived by his two children, Lucas and Logan. He served in the US Air Force, with 18 years spent as a flight engineer on the C-130. He had more than 4,000 hours experience, including 2,000 in a combat environment.

His team said his passion was always flying, as well as his children. 

They arrived in Australia on November 5 and have since dumped two million litres of water and fire retardant on blazes from Tasmania to NSW, flying up to eight missions a day.

Such hair-raising flying requiring precision manouvering just a few dozen metres off the ground in gusty winds. Thick smoke filling the air was routine.

At 12.05pm they set out from Richmond RAAF Base on the outskirts of Sydney on a 40C (104F) day for a two-hour flight to drop 15,000L on a massive 250,000ha megablaze. 

They never came back.

A panicked call came in to NSW Rural Fire Service command from firefighters on the ground who watched in horror as the plane went down and exploded.

‘Fire comms… message red speak to your captain. Message this is red… Crashed,’ the call began.

The flight path of the plane after it left Richmond, NSW, and headed for the fire front before crashing. The altitude tracker shots its sudden descent before losing contact

The flight path of the plane after it left Richmond, NSW, and headed for the fire front before crashing. The altitude tracker shots its sudden descent before losing contact

The RFS command responded: ‘Yeah fire comms… It’s just a ball of flames… over.’ 

United States vice president Mike Pence has offered his condolences to the families of the three men who died. 

‘Karen & I send our prayers & deep condolences to the families of the 3 brave American firefighters who died in AUS yesterday while on their way to battle the terrible bushfires,’ she said on Twitter. 

‘Our Nation will always honor the memory of those lost in the line of duty working to help others.’

NSW Rural Fire Service Commissioner Shane Fitzsimmons said there was not yet any indication as to what caused the crash and an investigation is underway.

Aircraft experts believe unless the plane had a mechanical fault, there are three likely ways the plane could have been brought down. 

Conditions were hellish enough with temperatures soaring above 40C and high winds that prevented waterbombing at all in nearby fire grounds.

Piloting a waterbombing plane is also up to seven times more exhausting than flying an airliner, and takes at least three fire seasons to learn. 

Three American firefighters died when their waterbomber crashed while fighting a huge bushfire

Three American firefighters died when their waterbomber crashed while fighting a huge bushfire

Devastated RFS staff embrace at Numeralla Rural Fire Brigade near the scene of the crash

Devastated RFS staff embrace at Numeralla Rural Fire Brigade near the scene of the crash

The decades-old plane may have been placed under so much stress that it simply fell apart and couldn’t keep flying.

Such a crash that killed three crew members happened in northern California in 2002 when another C-130’s wings fell off. 

The conditions, such as heat from the fire below, could also have created so much turbulence the pilots lost control of the plane.

They could also have gotten too close and become so disoriented in the thick smoke that they slammed into the ground.

The firefighters were on a plane chartered by American firefighting company Coulson Aviation that was in Australia to help tackle the bushfire crisis.

The three U.S. firefighters were experienced veterans who were well known to RFS volunteers and other emergency services

The three U.S. firefighters were experienced veterans who were well known to RFS volunteers and other emergency services

Coulsons grounded its large air tankers after the crash, both as a standard precaution and a sign of respect for the casualties.

But the organisation released a statement on Friday announcing pilots would soon return to work.

‘At Coulson Aviation, we have the incredible job of fighting fires around the world and we take pride in this responsibility,’ the statement read.

‘Right now, our hearts are with the crew’s family and friends and our Coulson family suffering in the loss of these three remarkable and well-respected crew members.

‘We must continue to work with emergency services to protect local communities. The aviation industry and emergency service sector is a small community both in Australia and around the world.

‘We are incredibly moved by the outpouring and support from those in Australia and around the world. Thank you for recognizing the work that our crews do and for expressing your condolences and grief for the families of our fallen heroes.’

Commissioner Fitzsimmons said the three victims were experienced firefighters who routinely crewed the C-130 for waterbombing missions.

‘It is a confronting and sobering reminder of the inherent risks associated with firefighting and we’ve seen all too often this season,’ he said.

‘Our hearts are with all those that are suffering what is the loss of three remarkable, well respected crew that have invested so many decades of their life into firefighting.’ 

Commissioner Fitzsimmons said rescuers battled through fire and smoke with terrible visibility for hours to find the wreckage.

Search operations were conducted by helicopters in Peak View, north-east of Cooma

Search operations were conducted by helicopters in Peak View, north-east of Cooma

‘Tragically, there appears to be no survivors as a result of the crash down in the Snowy Monaro area,’ he said. 

‘[The aircraft] impacted heavily with the ground and initial reports are that there was a large fireball associated with the impact of the plane as it hit the ground.’  

‘I am deeply saddened by the tragic news we received today,’ U.S. Ambassador Arthur Culvahouse said.

‘The brave Americans who died near Snowy Monaro died helping Australia in its time of need.  

‘The families and friends of those who we have lost are in our thoughts and prayers. Thank you Australia for your sympathy and solidarity.’

The crash caused a fire that crews are still trying to put out before the cause of the crash, which is unknown, can be investigated.

Investigators are now tasked with the harrowing task of searching for answers as they attempt to piece together what has happened

Investigators are now tasked with the harrowing task of searching for answers as they attempt to piece together what has happened

Commissioner Fitzsimmons said investigators were looking at all possibilities including trying to rule out a fuel problem that could affect the whole fleet.

‘There is no indication at this stage of what’s caused the accident,’ he said.

An investigation by the Australian Transport Safety Bureau is underway. 

NSW Premier Gladys Berejiklian offered her condolences to the families of the victims in the wake of the accident.

‘Our thoughts are not just with family and loved ones but for anyone who feels impacted by what has unfolded this afternoon,’ she said. 

People affected by the Pialligo bushfire (pictured) have been told it is too late to leave

People affected by the Pialligo bushfire (pictured) have been told it is too late to leave

The army was called in to help locate the crash site and extract any survivors

The army was called in to help locate the crash site and extract any survivors

‘We can’t thank enough people who continue, not withstanding the conditions, to put their safety at risk to protect lives and property of others.’  

‘It demonstrates the dangerous work currently being undertaken and the conditions that our firefighters are working under.’

The RFS said the area remains an active fire ground and a number of firefighting crews are currently working to contain and work around the fire. 

‘As indicated, we’ve still got more than 80 fires burning around New South Wales and half are not contained,’ Commissioner Fitzsimmons said.

‘We’ve seen fires get to emergency warning level today, up to five at any given time. We’ve backed down to four at the emergency warning level.’ 

Other fires burning in the area include one threatening homes in near Canberra Airport

Other fires burning in the area include one threatening homes in near Canberra Airport 

The blaze the downed C-130 was battling is a massive 240,000ha inferno where multiple bushfires joined together.

The dangerous out-of-control fire stretching from near Bega in the south to Jinden in the north with emergency warnings issued for more than a dozen towns.  

Areas where it was too late to leave included Bumbo, Eurobodalla, Bodalla, Wallaga Lake, Akolele, Bermagui, Coolagolite, and everything between Moruya and Tuross Head.

Residents in Tilba and Mystery Bay, Dignams Creek, and West Narooma were urged to flee immediately.

The fire on Kallaroo road in Pialligo by Canberra Airport remains at emergency level, after being downgraded overnight

The fire on Kallaroo road in Pialligo by Canberra Airport remains at emergency level, after being downgraded overnight

A rainbow cuts through the smoke near the crash site over the 250,000ha megablaze formed when at least four different fires joined together

A rainbow cuts through the smoke near the crash site over the 250,000ha megablaze formed when at least four different fires joined together

This fire could even join with another dangerous 98,000ha fire to its north that has encircled the coastal town of Batemans Bay.

Residents in Moruya, West Moruya, Mogendoura and Wamban were warned they were at serious risk and needed to protect themselves from the intense blaze. 

It was also too late to leave areas from Moruya to Tuross Head, and Bumbo, Bodalla and Eurobodalla. 

The RFS said waterbombers would not be able to assist in dousing the flames because of high winds – which also made the blaze more dangerous.

2019/2020 FIRE SEASON DEATH TOLL

The national death toll in Australia’s 2019/2020 bushfire season was 32 as of Thursday, January 23, with 24 confirmed deaths in New South Wales, three in South Australia and five in Victoria. 

OCTOBER

New South Wales: 

Robert Lindsey, 77, and Gwen Hyde, 68, were found in their burned out Coongbar home near Casino on October 9th. 

NOVEMBER

New South Wales:

The body of 85-year-old George Nole was found in a burnt out car near his home in Wytaliba, near Glen Innes.

Vivian Chaplain, a 69-year-old woman from Wytaliba, succumbed to her injuries in hospital after attempting in vain to save her home and animals from the blaze.

The body of 63-year-old Julie Fletcher was pulled from a scorched building in Johns River, north of Taree. 

Barry Parsons, 58, was found in a shed at Willawarrin, near Kempsey.

Chris Savva, 64, died after his 4WD overturned near burnt-out South Arm bridge, near Nambucca Heads.

A 59-year-old man was founded sheltered in a Yarrowitch water tank on November 7. He died of injuries on December 29. 

Victoria: 

David Moresi, 69, died after being involved in a traffic incident while working at the at the Gelantipy fire in East Gippsland on November 30. 

DECEMBER

New South Wales:   

Firefighters Andrew O’Dwyer, 36, and Geoffrey Keaton, 32, died on December 19 after a tree fell on their truck while they were travelling through Buxton, south of Sydney.

Samuel McPaul, 28, was battling a blaze in Jingellic, in Green Valley, about 70km east of Albury on the border of NSW and Victoria, on December 30 when a ‘fire tornado’ caused his 10-tonne firetruck to roll. 

South Australia:

The body of 69-year-old Ron Selth was found in his Charleston home, which was destroyed by the Cudlee Creek blaze on December 21. 

NEW YEAR’S EVE FIRES 

New South Wales: 

Dairy farmer Patrick Salway, 29, and his father Robert, 63, died trying to save their property in Cobargo, near Bega, on December 31. 

A 70-year-old man, named by local media as Laurie Andrew, was found dead outside a home at Yatte Yattah, west of Lake Conjola.

The body of a 70-year-old man was found in a burnt vehicle on a road off the Princes Highway at Yatte Yattah on the morning of New Year’s Day.

The body of a 62-year-old man was found in a vehicle on Wandra Road at Sussex Inlet about 11.30am on New Year’s Day.

A body, believed to be a 56-year-old man, found outside a home at Coolagolite, east of Cobargo on New Year’s Day.

An off-duty RFS firefighter, believed to be 72-year-old Colin Burns, was found near a car in Belowra after the New Year’s Eve fires swept through. 

Victoria: 

Beloved great-grandfather Mick Roberts, 67, from Buchan, in East Gippsland, was found dead at his home on the morning of New Year’s Day. 

Fred Becker, 75, was the second person to die in Victoria. He suffered a heart attack while trying to defend his Maramingo Creek home.

JANUARY

New South Wales:

David Harrison, a 47-year-old man from Canberra, suffered a heart attack defending his friend’s home near Batlow on Saturday, January 4. 

A 71-year-old man was found on January 6. Police have been told the man was last sighted on December 31, 2019 and was moving equipment on his property in Nerrigundah.

An 84-year-old man who stayed to defend his home in Cobargo, NSW, dies in hospital three weeks after fire hit. His pet dog Bella, who stayed by his side as fires raged, was also killed in the disaster.

Three American firefighters are killed when Coulson Aviation C-130 Hercules water bomber Zeus crashed while fighting fires near Cooma on Thursday January 23. They have been named as Capt. Ian H. McBeth, 44, First Officer Paul Clyde Hudson and Flight Engineer Rick A. DeMorgan Jr, 43.

 On January 24, the remains of a 59-year-old man were found in a Bodalla home destroyed by bushfires near the NSW South Coast town of Moruya. 

Victoria:

Forest Fire Management firefighter Mat Kavanagh, 43, was killed Friday January 3 when he was involved in a two-car crash on the Goulburn Valley Highway.

Bill Slade, a 60-year-old father of two from Wonthaggi was fighting fires with Parks Victoria at Omeo when he died on January 11. He has been remembered as one of the longest serving, most experienced and fittest firefighters.  

South Australia: 

Well-known outback pilot Dick Lang, 78, and his 43-year-old son, Adelaide surgeon Clayton Lang, died in the Kangaroo Island bushfire after their car was trapped by flames.  



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